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Can someone explain winterizing to me? I have a 200 hp Evinrude outboard. When do I need to winterize and how? I run it all summer and at least once every two months in the winter for blackmouth usually more. Do I need to winterize? How long should it sit before I consider winterizing it?
 

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I would say you need to winterize about a month ago. When the weather is freezing, it is usually too late, especially as cold as it is now. I winterize usually Nov. 1st, and then after every trip out, and I have an I/O with a closed cooling kit. I winterize to protect my outdrive and anywhere else water might be hiding. It is cheep insurance, especially when you consider replacing a 200hp outboard. $$$ It is a cheap, easy, and quick thing to do to just run some antifreeze into the motor when you store it for a while. If you plan to use it again in a week, winterize it anyway as it only takes one cold frozen night to ruin a good motor. I have a friend who didn't think he needed to and had to replace a motor and outdrive. Not a pleasant thing.
 

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No need to winterize an outboard as long as you run it every now and then throughout the winter. If it was going to sit all winter you should fog etc. Just keep your gas tank topped off to prevent condensation and add some gas stabilizer.
 

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Winterizing an outboard is a very simple thing and there are a few different methods that you can use. Here is what I like to do.
1) I make sure that I have fuel stabilizer in my tank after the middle of October because my usage of the boat slows from 3-4 days a week to maybe once every week or two. I use Seafoam in the fuel because not only is it a good stabilizer but it is also a good fuel system cleaner and it helps to remove carbon deposits as well.
2) I tip the motor down so that any water inside can run out. That way there won't be any pockets of water that can freeze if it gets cold.
3) You can drain your float bowls on the carbs if you want to but I prefer to just start the motor on the hose every 3 weeks or so to make sure that the gas in the carbs gets cycled through.
4) If the motor is going to sit unused all winter then I might think about fogging it but it really isn't necessary in this part of the country.
5) I like to grease all the fittings so that there aren't any surprises in the spring. Don't forget the steering cable.
6) I also hose down the trim and tilt rams with a product called "fluid film" which is sort of like WD40 but it is lanolin based and it doesn't wash off like WD40 will
7) Finally, if the boat won't be used at all then I recommend removing the battery and periodically charging it to keep it fully charged through the winter.

In the springtime, new plugs and lower unit oil and a de carb treatment and you are ready to go. Here is the procedure I use for decarbing the motors and it can be done with the motor in a barrel, on the hose or at the dock. If on the hose or in a barrel don't over rev the motor, just keep it running. It isn't a good idea to exceed 3000 rpms on a motor not in gear. 4 strokes build up carbon too and this method works for them as well. The article is from another site. Hope this helps.
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This works for Carbed, EFI, Ficht, HPDI, Optimax and even 4 strokes...

First you need a separate small fuel tank. One of those 3 gal red Tempos works great or an empty gal milk jug will also work, but might be a bit messier..

I use Seafoam over the OEM stuff like OMC Engine Tuner or Merc Power Tune because in the last few years they changed the formula and you have to let them sit up 12 hours. Who's got time for that?? Seafoam you can buy from NAPA, CarQuest or other auto stores. Seafoam works in 15 mins.

You'll need 3/4 gal of gasoline and one 16oz can of seafoam for each engine. Don't forget to add 3oz of oil if you are premixing in a carbed engine. Use about 3 ft piece of fuel hose off the little tank. You connect this tank to your engine by pulling off the main tank fuel hose off the intake side of your water separating fuel filter and plug the hose off the small tank on to that fitting. Or you can separate the fuel line on the tank side primer ball, so you can still use your primer. If you have an engine that has fuel plug then you need a fuel plug on the little tanks hose.

Start the engine, let it warm up and start pulling the mix into the engine. You may have to increase the idle to keep it running once she get loaded with the Seafoam. Run the engine 15 mins in the dock or just cruising around under 2500. Then shut it down and let it sit for 15 mins. Restart the engine, the smoke you see is the carbon burning off. Do the whole thing again and let her sit again for 15 mins. If she smokes after the second time do it again, but I've never seen one still smoke after three doses. The gallon mix should be enough to do this 3 times. You don't need any wide open throttle, you don't need to change the plugs. If it's cleaning the combustion chambers it's also cleaning the plugs, but every 50-60hrs is good time to change plugs in most engines.

I cleaned a antique evinrude one time that had a 1/4" of solid carbon on the exhaust chamber walls by running a 1/2 gal of the mix through it. Seafoam has been around since the 30's and it's what they used when they were burning straight 4 stroke 40SAE oils in outboards.

You guys with the 4 strokes think you are immune from this? Those engines work 10 times as hard as any auto engine ever will and they will carbon up. I bought a Bronco two years ago that had 95,000 miles on it. When I used seafoam on it I had the neighbors hanging out of their front doors looking for where the fire was after I started it the first time there so much smoke.

Too many are under the assumption that it's totally the 2 stroke oil that causes the carbon, Wrong... it's also the additives they put in the fuels today. The carbon inhibitors in 2 stroke oil are there for this reason also. Remember when gasoline used to smell like gasoline, today it smells more like bad cologne.

For those guys that like to do the carbon treatment by spraying it down the carbs Seafoam also comes in spray can called Deep Creep. It's the same stuff under pressure. Says right on the can Oxygen Sensor Safe, for you Yam guys.

After that if your engine maunf recommends a daily additive treatment then do that in the mean time, but all 2 stroke outboard need decarboned every 50-60hrs. If I owned a 4 stroke I would do it the same. Once you are set up with the tank and hose the Seafoam is only 5-6 bucks can. It to easy not to do it.
 

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Woodfighter, the section of my post describing the de-carbing of the "Bronco" is an article I Cut and Pasted from another forum site, I don't own a Bronco. De Carbing your outboards every spring is a very important process that keeps the combustion chambers cleaner and motors running smoother.
 
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