Newbie canning questions | Gamefishin.com

Newbie canning questions

Discussion in 'The Outdoor Chef! Great outdoor cooking' started by BGR1, Jul 8, 2015.

  1. BGR1

    BGR1 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Messages:
    564
    I would like to can some pink salmon for gifts and sandwiches over the winter. This will be my first attempt, so I am hopeful someone with more experience can answer some of my dumb questions. I would prefer to use 1/2 pint jars because of serving size. I think I have my preferred canners narrowed down to the All American 15 1/2, and the All American 21 1/2.
    Question 1:
    Which would be best for canning 6 - 12 smoked pinks at a time?
    Question 2:
    Is there any difference in equipment or difficulty in using 1/2 pint jars? 1/4 pint?
    Question 3:
    Inside or outside over a propane burner?
    Question 4:
    My family is tending 6 raised beds of vegetables and fruits. Will this canner accomplish both tasks?
    Question 5:
    Are special mason jars required for pressure canning?

    I am sure I will come up with some more questions later. Thanks in advance for any advice.
     
  2. fishslave

    fishslave Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2006
    Messages:
    13,456
    1: Buy the largest you can afford. People do like to spend more for the American brand, but it's not that crucial. I've been using the same 23 quart Presto Canner for 25 years now and have only had to replace the seal once and the vent plug once.

    2: I've only used the 1/4 pint jars for canning apple and pear butters. I like to have half pints and pints of fish. The half pint size will make two sandwiches for us or just enough for topping a green salad. For casseroles or patties, the pint is better.

    3: Outside over a propane burner during the hot months and make sure you have a heavy metal plate between the flame and the bottom of your canner so you don't damage the bottom. I know some have no trouble, but others have. I prefer to be cautious.

    I don't know what kind of stove you have in your kitchen. We bought a new one with the ceramic top and I can't use it for canning. Some folks have had them crack.

    4: Any canner intended for canning does fish, meats, vegetables etc. Most fruit is better with a hot water bath method instead of pressure method. I actually gave up canning fruit and freeze it all now. I freeze most veggies too. If ever we had some emergency that took out our electricity, I have the ability to keep everything frozen until I can get it canned to "save" it from going bad. If hubby gets an elk and/or a muley this year, I will probably can a whole lot of that.

    5: I use Ball or Kerr jars. I have pressure canned fish in Ball jelly jars and have never had a problem.

    Most canning directions tell you to sterilize the lids in boiling water. Ball now says not to do that with the new lids, but to keep them in hot water before placing them on the jar.

    Have fun!
     
  3. Cowlitzfisherman

    Cowlitzfisherman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Messages:
    12,397
    What Marsha had said pretty much covers it! I prefer the larger "All American" pressure cookers and they will last you more then a lifetime. I have had ours for over 28 years now and have never had a single problem with it....you get what you pay for! Ours does 8 quarts or 16 pints at a time which really cuts down on your canning time when you have a lot to can. We always can our fish in the pint size because once you open it up, it will be eaten fast! With the larger American pressure cooker, you can use it for water bathing, or even boiling up your grabs. As far as boiling your lids go, that process will occur under pressure cooking, so there is no reason to boil them separately. They say that you don't have to boil your jars if they are "clean", but we always boil them just to be safe.

    Canning can be fun, but it does call for keeping your attention to the "pressure" gauge on the bigger cookers. Most all of our veggies are balanced and frozen except for our pole beans. Make sure that you do not disturb the jars once you take them out of the pressure cooker, or they may not seal properly. We prefer to do our "fish" canning outside on the deck. It's cooler, cleaner, and it doesn't smell up the house for next couple of hours/days. If you do it in the house, make sure that you put some heavy cloth towels down on you counter tops for the jars to cool unless your counter tops can withstand the heat from the jars.

    Good luck Brian, these are a few tips that may help you, and if you need more help, feel free to ask us.

    Enjoy

    Cowlitzfisherman
     
  4. HOBO98498

    HOBO98498 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,707
    Here is a link to a previous canning forum https://www.gamefishin.com/threads/pressure-canning-salmon-in-jars-pressure-cooker.25064/#post-320363
    1. Buy as large of a pressure canner as you can afford
    2. Can the size that will be eaten in several days
    3. Pressure canning is sensitive to temp changes. When I first started canning I did it in the house on the stove. That typically is a very temp consistent method. I later moved outside to a propane burner. The caveat to that is that your always trying to deal with the right amount of heat to keep your pressure correct. Also if you are doing fish it's nice to keep the smell out doors. Propane can also have blowouts when turned down low. Don't walk away from it
    4. Yes. There is a difference between pressure & hot water bath canning. The book that comes with your pressure canner will tell you the process.
    5. I prefer Ball jars & Lids
     
  5. sirfishalotz

    sirfishalotz Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    553
    I ve been on a canning mission the last few weeks ... Canning up Kokanee , Sockeye and Tuna

    I use a 23 quart presto . It has served us well the last 10 years Canning meat and garden veggies.

    The batch of Sockeye and Kokanee I did inside with no trouble , I only did the tuna outside with a propane burner as I heard the smell could be a problem.

    It's going to depend on your propane burner on how much baby sitting you will have to do with it. Most dont recommend a burner over 12,000 btu's . as it wont get low enough to keep a low pressure.

    I had to baby sit the tuna on the propane a lot more then the kitchen stove but it worked out good.

    There is no difference in the quarter pints to the half pints . I prefer the quarter pints for the smoked Kokanee i make .

    As far as canners go, bigger the better as it helps get the job done quicker .
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. bairfishin

    bairfishin Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2014
    Messages:
    106
    Anybody have a good recipe they would like to share for smoking brine as well as a canning recipe?
     
  7. sirfishalotz

    sirfishalotz Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    553
    Do you plan on canning smoked fish ? If so I just smoke the fish for an hour without any brine , then add a 1/4 teaspoon of salt to the jar
     
  8. bairfishin

    bairfishin Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2014
    Messages:
    106
    So, if I follow correctly, just smoke the fish, don't use a brine, then put in a mason jar with 1/4 tsp of salt? No water or anything else? Just the salt?
     
  9. sirfishalotz

    sirfishalotz Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    553
    Correct .
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. bairfishin

    bairfishin Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2014
    Messages:
    106
    I'm assuming you are cooking in a pressure cooker right?
     
  11. Dimples

    Dimples Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,374
    One pan of alder chip smoke in a lil chief smoker for about 20 minutes then quickly into the jars. It gets sloppy to work with if heated much longer. The canning intensifies the smoke and saltiness so don't use any salt, the fish has enough for my taste naturally. I do add slices of raw jalepino peppers to the jars but no liquid. Water and oil cook out of the fish and leaves liquid in the jars.

    My canner is the smaller one and holds one row pints and half pints on top row. It's not tall enough for double pints but the amount of fish that the small smoker holds is exactly the amount the canner holds
    I crowd the fish in the smoker more than you would if making regular smoked fish.

    I use a propane burner on the side of a BBQ and after it gets going pull the canner partway off the burner to regulate the heat down. My cooker likes to run between 12-14 pounds, only 10 is required but I don't fight it and let her go at the 12-14. In the old days we ran 15 pounds.

    Had a jar lid buckle last year and that happens if you over stuff a jar. Make sure to leave the head space as indicated in the Kerr canning book. There is a great YouTube video from the Alaska cooperative extension University of Fairbanks. Best tutorial!

    Here is a couple pics including my buckled lid from last year.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. bairfishin

    bairfishin Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2014
    Messages:
    106
    Where's the pics though?
     
  13. Dimples

    Dimples Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,374
    IMG_20140909_101817272.jpg

    Start with quality fish. This batch is King salmon but I also did coho and steelhead. This year may do pinks too.

    You can see the buckled lid on the front jar.


    IMG_20140911_161118130.jpg IMG_20140911_194521438.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2015
  14. bairfishin

    bairfishin Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2014
    Messages:
    106
    What about vinegar to soften the bones? Are those pinks? Also, it looks like you filet the skin off?
     
  15. Dimples

    Dimples Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,374
    Went back and added a pic of the fish.

    No vinegar, the canning softens the bones. No liquid at all.

    Just fish with 15 minutes of smoke and raw jalepino. Nothing else.

    I took the skin off this batch but not always. Don't care to eat it but it picks off easily after canned.
     
    • Like Like x 1
Search tags for this page
canning salmon for dummies
,

canning salmon in jars

,

canning salmon instructions

,
canning salmon process
,
how long will pressur cooked salmon last in a can
,
how to can salmon without a pressure cooker
,

how to pressure cook salmon

,

pressure canning salmon

,
pressure canning salmon instructions
,
what flavor to add to canning smoked salmon