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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was going to tie up some more leaders for some hootchies and ace hi-flys.

I know to use 50 lb, that's not at question.

The question is a mono, or fluoro leader?

I know the fluoro is more expensive, but is it really any better?
 

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Isn't fluorocarbon thinner? If it is I don't think it would work as well. You need pretty stiff line to create the desired action you want on a hootchie. Mike
 

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I use 30lb Berkeley Big Game.

I don't see the need for FC. IMO its pretty tough for a fish to see the leader,when they're intent on trying to catch the lure whipping around in their face.

I can see where the abrasion resistance of FC would be a plus.
 

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Flororcarbon isn't significantly thinner and not any better IMO. It's a waste of money for salt water leaders. I do like how well it slides when knot tying though.

60# Berkley big game works great!
 

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50# Big Game mono. I don't like the way 60# ties up. Convention wisdom is: Salmon in the saltchuck are not leader shy - and I prefer not to sacrifice the superior knot strenght that mono offers for the invisibility of flourocarbon.
 

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50 lb test... pull it straight out of the weed wacker! j/k...

I have used lighter in the past when fish have been really picky, but if you catch a few fish on it you have to re-tie too often... but when fishing for silvers it doesnt matter... they will hit anything... so the 50# is no prob and you dont have to re-tie unless the hook gets messed up.
 

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Be careful which fluoro you buy if you buy it. Some have abrasion resistant qualities and others do not. I have heard from a couple guys that it is not as strong as mono rated for the same strength (comparing maxima to seaguar). It isn't needed for salmon. I use it for tuna since the water is crystal clear and they have incredible eye sight. John Beath said he used it for fishing rivers inlet, but I'm not very sold on that concept since the water is dirty there anyway. Why do you need to make the leader "disappear". The fish already can't see it.

On another note: Fishermen from the east coast going for bluefin tuna pre stretch their leaders so that light can't reflect off of the coils in the mono. leader. Of course they are using 200 lb. leaders, but you get the idea. Around here, I would say go with Maxima or P-Line 40lb to 50lb. for hoochies. Drop it down to 20 to 25lb. for bait. 30 lb. is good for spoons. They have their own action.
 

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Line test ratings are different across the board. I'd bet Maxima 20lbs test is one of the strongest in the market, but looks at its thickness. Fluorocarbon is a bit stiffer than mono, if I remember correctly, so that could lead to more movement translated to your hottchie from the flasher.
 

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madcapmag said:
Line test ratings are different across the board. I'd bet Maxima 20lbs test is one of the strongest in the market, but looks at its thickness. Fluorocarbon is a bit stiffer than mono, if I remember correctly, so that could lead to more movement translated to your hottchie from the flasher.
There aren't many monos on the market that actually break at their stated strength. Ande is about the only "common" line to break at what its listed at.

I laugh at the posts about the best line. Tons of people pick Maxima because they say its so strong. Of course its strong,its understated. 8lb is actually like 12,10 is like 14,and 12 is like 16.

20lb Maxima probably breaks at over 30lbs.
 

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You've got it right, HunterP. Thats why there's IGFA rated lines. For example, lets say the current world record marlin for 20lbs test is 400lbs and the current record for 30lbs test is 550 lbs. You catch a 500lbs marlin using 20lbs test X brand line. You send everything in, including a sample of your line. IGFA determines your line actually breaks at 30lbs. No record for you.

If they are still avalable, look up VHawk's line tests. Good information!

With all this new UV stuff, I wonder how different lines look under UV? If the UV theory holds (UV light can be "seen" by fish at much greater depths than regular light), I wonder if one type of line would be preferrable because of how it "appears" under UV?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My concern has nothing to do with invisability.

I was more curious about the quality when fighting a fish. Does one offer better shock resistance, is one a little stiffer to give you better hoochie action.

That type of thing. Not whether or not the fish can see the leader line or not.
 

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Not sure about shock, but like I mentioned, I'm almost 100% sure the fluoro leader is stiffer than mono. I say fluoro leader because they have flurorcarbon lines on the market that are supposed to be less stiff and more spinning reel friendly than their leader material counterparts. One of the stiffest lines I've felt was P-Line Halo.
 

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Depends on brand, but I would say from what I've notice, that the Gamma and Seaguar regular fluor carbon is stiffer. This doesn't equate to a better line though. You want to check the abrasion resistance of the line as well. Some of those fluoro lines can't stand a scratch. The real question is: fluoro or mono....do you really think you are going to find a fish that will break 40 lb or 50 lb test line? Your not would come undone before you could break the line unless you are doing something stupid like using the same leader all season long or using a 40 lb leader for halibut. If you're only looking at stiffness, then go the store and feel the lines. Depends on brand. If you want to catch fish, look at the hole picture. Resistance to abrasion, UV resistance, overall line life, stiffness, color are all things you should consider. Tup:
 
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