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SeaRanger21 said:
Fish Boy said:
J.D. said:
spanish fly said:
With that logic they should ban Electric Downriggers,then extend the salmon season.... :roll:
The were illegal in parts of Canada for a time. Actually, I think they still are in a few certain places up there. And again IPHC-set Halibut quota's are met in pounds, not by individual fish.

Instead of banning electric sport reels in OR, why don't they ban commercial draggers instead?
they shouldnt because draggers need to make a living to.
unbelievable
my bad for tooting my own horn ill shut up now.
 

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I use them on my boat. I used to hand crank, but i am gettin old. Besides there is very little if any sport in Halibut fishing, its a meat fishery. All your doing is hauling a sheet of plywood up from 600 ft. There is very little fight. If you want to experience a fight, catch tuna.
 

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Below is the the text from a letter drafted by NSIA and sent to the IPHC.

January 14, 2008

Re: Proposal by Walter Pasternak to prohibit the use of electric or hydraulic reels when sport fishing for halibut.

Honorable Commissioners,

On behalf of the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association I am writing to supply comment on the proposal to eliminate the use of electric or hydraulic reels by sport fishermen in pursuit of halibut. The NSIA consists of hundreds of businesses, dozens of northwest sport fishing organization and clubs, and individuals who are dedicated to and dependant on healthy fishery resources. A listing of our membership is attached to these comments.

First we note that there is no data or study attached to the applicant’s supposition that this proposal is a benefit to the resource. Making a proposal that is for the benefit of the resource, should first accurately describe the threat to the resource, and quantify how this regulation proposal is designed to address said threat. The proposal does neither.

To address the subject of small motors on reels we have several concerns and comments:

• Electric reels are primarily used to deploy and then check bait, especially in deep depths. Even able bodied men can experience back and shoulder pain from repeated bait checks, especially in deeper water.
• Exclusion. I suffer from chronic back and neck pain from being hit in a car accident by a drunk driver. Considering injury, strength, size and other health factors, excluding electric reels would constrain halibut fishing to only the strongest of men and women.
• Finally, we would note that at one time, there were no motors to assist in the commercial take of halibut, either. Original Long line gear was hand retrieve, but the majority of the commercial fleet has moved on to better technology.

Both fleets and their adherents have benefited from improvement in technologies. Because so much of the halibut sport fishing in Oregon and Washington are conducted in 30-40 fathom depth. From an industry standpoint, this product is an important segment of reel sales, with shrinking participation in the NW. In Oregon and Washington, our industry has lost 300,000 customers between 2001 and 2006. We ask that the IPHC avoid further regulatory restrictions without proven benefit to the resource.

Liz Hamilton
Executive Director
[email protected]
 

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Way to go LIZ! Nice letter
 

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Next thing you know, you will not be able to shoot the things either nuke:
 

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I believe the intent of the proposal was to ban electric or hydraulic jigging machines from being used for sportsfish retention. The Conference Board sent this proposal back for more clarity in the wording, so as not to be confused with electric fishing reels.
 

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Steve, Do you have the clarificaion?
Thanks
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
TrollKing said:
I believe the intent of the proposal was to ban electric or hydraulic jigging machines from being used for sportsfish retention. The Conference Board sent this proposal back for more clarity in the wording, so as not to be confused with electric fishing reels.
What exactly is a "electric or hydraulic jigging machine"?
 

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The intent of the letter was to prohibit automatic jigging machines in southeastern Alaska, particularly as they are currently used by some sport boats for sablefish. This was a proposal at the Halibut Commission meeting, and the Conference Board recognized the intent, but sent it back to the proposer because the wording was too ambiguous. At least from the Halibut community, there was little support for this kind of a proposal.

But, you are right, Hook. This kind of thing has a way of creeping in, folks wanting us to go back to the old way. Why, I remember stories of when our native brothers fished halibut with lines made from kelp and hooks they actually carved themselves. Of course, my father walked barefoot through 4 miles of snow just to get to school!
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Thanks Trollking. Yes, these type of things defiantly have a way of creeping in and this one is particularly concerning for anyone who sport fishes for halibut and uses electric reels.

Is this a jigging machine?



# Gear - 3:9:1
# Drag -33lbs/15kg
# Weight - 28.4oz/805g (1.77 lbs)
# Speed - 754ft/230m per minute
# Line - 330 yards 60lb braid
# Max winding power (110lbs)
# Dual Speed - "Power" & "Speed"
# Level Wind with Auto-Stop
# Line Counter - Digital readout
# Washable design
# Speed adjustable accelerator lever
# Electric (12V) or Manual Retrieve
# 9ft Power Cord with Alligator Clips

These Diawa reels can be set to automatically jig. So it makes me wonder if they would be considered jigging machines?
 
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