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I just seen on a canadian site where thy are going to make the e-licence no good for area 23 and 123 and are going to reduce the possion limit to 2 fish in this year.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I dont know how to do a link .It was on sport fishing bc forum and also the fisheries and ocean site has a notice tha the halibut season is closed until march so thy can have time to post the changes.
 

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cat fisher said:
I just seen on a canadian site where thy are going to make the e-licence no good for area 23 and 123 and are going to reduce the possion limit to 2 fish in this year.
Aren't those areas closest to Neah Bay. Is that possession limit just for those areass are all areas?
 

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This is the only notice I saw

Fishing for halibut will remain closed effective 00:01 February 1 to 29, 2008.
The fishery will open March 1, 2008.

The assessment for Pacific halibut is conducted annually by the International
Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC) which is provided at the January 2008 IPHC
annual general meeting. Results from this meeting indicated that the biomass
of older halibut or the exploitable biomass was continuing to decline. They
concluded that a reduction in harvest rate was necessary to provide the optimal
combination of harvest and to ensure viable spawning biomass for the future.
Therefore, the Total Allowable Catch (TAC) for Canada will be reduced from 11.4
million lbs in 2007 to 9 million lbs for 2008.

This situation will require changes to the recreational fishery in order to
stay within domestic allocations.

DFO has been working in consultation with the SFAB to develop management
options for 2008. Consultations and decisions are still underway. In order to
complete the necessary consultation requirements and avoid in season changes to
the recreational fishery, the opening date will be delayed.

9 million pounds, we only 230,000 lbs in our state. Crazy
 

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They must really not like us going up there to catch their fish even though the ones they are catching are coming from the same place as the ones that come to the US. Isn't it funny how the IPHC doesn't govern our halibut fishery the same way they do Canada? What a crock.

I just hope they don't go to one halibut per angler per day with 2 in possession. That would sure cut down on the amount of people going up there. I know we wouldn't make that many trips.

TUNA TIME ANYONE?
 

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Cornfed,
All the IPHC does is set the overall harvest quota by region (Oregon/Washington; Canada; southeast Alaska, etc).
It is up to each government as to how they stay within that quota allotment. The IPHC collects commercial catch data in each area and monitors the procedures used to determine sports take.

there is all you have ever wanted to know about halibut at the IPHC webpage http://www.iphc.washington.edu/halcom/default.htm
 

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Yes...you're right, I was just wondering how they are interpretting data and what assumptions they are making on halibut migration. So I guess the question is "Why are our seasons sooo much shorter than both Canada and Oregon?" Why are our quotas peanuts compared to our neighbors?
 

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The same reason there's so much hub-bub abou the springers. The same reason there's so much fighting about the sockeye. The same reason we argue about the crabbing. The same reason we wonder about the steelhead. :|
 

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Cornfed,
Last year, recent info on migration of adult halibut between areas made the local areas assessments problematic, at best. Seeing that, the IPHC recommended an all-area assessment last year, and it was rejected by the Commissioners, with the stipulations that there would be a critcal review of the methodology in 2007. that review took place, and for 2008, the Commissoners accepted the "coastwide assessement'. Now, the IPHC figures one stock number, and then apportions that stock between regions according to our survey catch rates (over 1000 fishing stations each year from Oregon to the Bering Sea) and also figuring in bottom area.

During 2008, the commissioners have requested a critical review of the apportionment method.

It's a pretty interesting process. Washington and Oregon actually have about the same sport quota. BC gets a lot more, but it is a lot larger area and had a much more dense stock of halibut.
 
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