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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dad and I, Are going to be purchasing a newer boat and he is talking around the 25,000- 30,000$ range. He has been looking at a Thunder Jet , but the drawback i hear is it has a 350 inboard jet, which will take up a bunch of space, but he prefers an inboard over an outboard.Its his call, his money lol Have any of you on this board seen any of the North RIvers or any other manufacturers that are equivalent to the size motor he is looking at,for sale? Prices? Any other suggestions? If he is going to be spending this much mula on a boat, then i want the best options for him. He is also talking about putting on a 9.9 yami vs the 8 h.p. which would be the best and why? I was checking out the boat porn and seen many of you with North Rivers.. Pro's and Cons? Thanks for any suggestions -bb
 

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I do not own a North River, but my new boat I went with a 9.9 versus the 8. My Dad talked me into more horsepower in case you get stuck. In my case I have Mercury and the weight difference was less than 10 pounds. Hope this helps.
 

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Figure out where you will be using the boat the most. Shallow rivers, Columbia, lake, or salt. The only reason to get an inboard jet is if you will be in rivers and want a windshield and top. Otherwise go with an outboard.
I have a 21' North River inboard jet and really like it, but sometimes wish I had a deeper V when it is choppy on larger water. You do give up a large amount of room with the inboard, but North River has a good set up with their engine cover. It seems to be smaller than others I have been in.

Look at different brands and models within each brand to find the boat that will do the most that you are looking for.
 

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Yep, the inboard won't hurt so much when you run it aground in Grey's Harbor...... :D :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
LOL... Wow, i thought i was the only one who remembered that incident.. :mrgreen: Tell us the story, if you see birds walking on water in front of you, keep in mind you will be tearing all the belts off the motor and using the kicker to make your way back to the dock... lol
 

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What ever boat you and your dad purchase I hope to get to check it out....in person. Tup:
 

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Boats are just like Ford and Chevy. Some like one brand and some other like a different brand. There are very few "bad" boats on the water. Alumaweld,North River,Willie,Custom Weld,TJ,etc. all make good boats.

I chose North River based on the boats I test drove. It had the best ride.

As far as the kicker goes,get the T8. The T8 is the Gold standard of kickers and is PLENTY of hp for the boats your looking at. A 9.9 won't make the boat move any faster because of hull speed. Hull speed is basically the fastest a boat can go without planing. The fastest an aluminum boat like you're looking at will go without planing is about 7mph. At that point,its pushing a huge wall of water and can't overcome the bow wave.

I've had my boat out in some big winds and heavy seas,and had plenty of control with the T8. The T8 has huge gears and turns a big prop. Its made to push heavy loads.
 

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CommanderX said:
Figure out where you will be using the boat the most. Shallow rivers, Columbia, lake, or salt. The only reason to get an inboard jet is if you will be in rivers and want a windshield and top. Otherwise go with an outboard.
I have a 21' North River inboard jet and really like it, but sometimes wish I had a deeper V when it is choppy on larger water. You do give up a large amount of room with the inboard, but North River has a good set up with their engine cover. It seems to be smaller than others I have been in.

Look at different brands and models within each brand to find the boat that will do the most that you are looking for.
How much fuel do you burn with you IB jet?

With my F150 I burn about 5gph at about 3000rpms. Thats right about 30mph or so.
 

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As many of you know, Rory (Riverfishin) now has my old NR. I loved that boat and only sold it due to buying a 27' C-Dory and not being able to keep both. In fact, I really wish I had kept it and sold the C-Dory instead! The old NR has a Kodiak 350 in it. The previous owner to me took the padded mat off the engine cover and replaced it with a 1" thick piece of rubber. Essentially this makes for a great table! The other benefit to me is that when you are fishing in rough water you can wedge yourself between the gunnel and the motor box making fishing much safer. A big inboard also lowers your center of gravity making the ride in rough water smoother IMHO. Another benefit to having an inboard is that you will typically also get a red-dot heater as well. This works on the same principal as a car heater and they are great! There were only a few times I used the NR that the heater didn't get turned on at least once! And with the backdrop on the top closed up, you could be in shirt sleeves during a snow storm and still be comfortable.

One thing to make sure of if you buy one of these is to find one with suspension seats. You will be forever sorry if you don't have them! These boats are rough riding boats. But they are great fishing platforms and will allow you to do just about any fishing in our area. The only thing I would not do in my old one would have been Halibut fishing miles offshore. And that was only due to not wanting to spend hours coming in if the waves kicked up and not being able to have enough fuel on board! Plus that lovely inboard roar would make you deaf by the time you got out there!

As for the kicker, both the T8 or T9.9 should get the job done. As they both are high thrust models that is the primary concern. The 9.9 would have a little more torque and might work better in a heavy current over the T8, but I don't think it is really needed. I used a Honda 7.5 on the 19' NR and it worked just fine but a high thrust model would have worked better.

Also, a compromise (not necessarily a good or bad one IMHO) would be a SportJet powered boat. They are much lighter in weight, and take up much less interior space. You lose the ability to have an on board heater, and they are not very fuel efficient compared to a V8 or outboard from what I have heard. Also, they are 2-stroke motors so they are constantly dumping 2 stroke oil into the exhaust, and thus into the water just like all 2-strokes. They are however FAST. The light weight with high horsepower makes for a fast boat. My old boat on a good day would do between 30 and 35Mph. Most of the SportJets I've seen would do high 40's to low 50's. The newer Inboards with the high HP motors will also do that though (mine was a lower HP model).

BTW: Here is a nice looking SportJet powered Alumaweld for sale by one of our long time members.
 

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If you are going to run that boat in the salt, I wouldn't get an inboard jet. Flushing after each use is manditory and these jets don't allow for good flushing on a hose. With an inboard you can figure on having to replace your exhaust manifolds every 5 to 10 years(depending on usage) and for a Chev V8 that is about $1500 for just the manifolds. My own personal preference is towards outboards as they are much lighter and there is much more room in the boat for fishing.

Whatever you decide to buy, maintenance is the key word. If your boat even comes near salt water, flush your motors religiously. Otherwise you end up where a board member is right now. His/her kicker was not flushed regularly and now it is salt encrusted with no water flow through the power head. This is a very preventable condition but sadly some do not take the time to maintain their equipment. Good luck on your hunt!
 

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Hunter P said:
CommanderX said:
Figure out where you will be using the boat the most. Shallow rivers, Columbia, lake, or salt. The only reason to get an inboard jet is if you will be in rivers and want a windshield and top. Otherwise go with an outboard.
I have a 21' North River inboard jet and really like it, but sometimes wish I had a deeper V when it is choppy on larger water. You do give up a large amount of room with the inboard, but North River has a good set up with their engine cover. It seems to be smaller than others I have been in.

Look at different brands and models within each brand to find the boat that will do the most that you are looking for.
How much fuel do you burn with you IB jet?

With my F150 I burn about 5gph at about 3000rpms. Thats right about 30mph or so.
The boat has a 6.0 liter, fuel injected, with a Hamilton 212. I am closer to 10 gallons per hour, but that's usually at multiple speeds. The lowest cruising speed is about 30 mph at 3200 rpm. That's about the minimum before I start to come off plane. I usually run it closer to 40 mph if conditions are right. It is definitely not the most economical to run long distances, but it was never intended for that. It is a fast and quick boat that gets on plane within it's boat length and can stop about that quick also.
 

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Hunter, unfortunately comparing fuel usage in a car/truck and a boat is apples and oranges. Your car/boat rolls on tires while your boat is essentially always running against the force of water or drag, sort of like always going up hill.

Most of the newer outboards use approx.6- 8 gph at cruise, I/O's with an outdrive are a little better than that. Inboard jets are probably the least efficient of the 3 choices. I don't know about outboard jets but I would think they wouldn't be that efficient either. Obviously boat size, weight and configuration affect all these factors.
 

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i am not a jet drive expert but the jet mechanism sucks alot of power from whatever powerhead that it is operating under. THis is well documented but given this fact, you know that it puts more wear by causing you motor to have to work harder to get the same or less power. By this fact alone i would prefer an I/O 350 over any outboard for the reason that they are built with heavier components than an outboard. a 350 is a tried and true powerplant that has been used in nearly every application imaginable using relatively the same configuration. a 350 I/O will THEORETICALLY last longer than an outboard that has smaller crank, bearings etc. and I prefer outboards for all other reasons other than a condition that puts excessive strain on the motor.
 

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DBAppraiser said:
Sorry, saw the reference to F150 and thought it was a truck reference. My bad.
Lol! :mrgreen:

I didn't even think of the possibility of someone thinking I was referencing a truck as opposed to a 4 stroke Yamaha 150.

I was sitting here thinking what the heck is he talking about. :mrgreen:
 

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In my defense, you would not have been the first person to try and compare automotive mileage to boat mileage. There was a guy a while ago on one of the marine boards that was wondering why the 350 V8 in his truck did so much better on gas as compared to the 350 I/O in his boat. He had no concept of the drag created by the water, also water is typically fairly flat for the most part. :D
 

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Chevy 350's are a good power plant but, outboards are better all the way around and I will explain why!! Chev 350 has split shell bronze bushing type bearings on the crank and rods, Outboards are ALL (except for the very, very old kicker motors) roller bearings on the crank and rods. Chev 350 have timing chains, cam shafts, lifters, rocker arms, and valves.Timing chains stretch, cam shafts run in the same bushing style bearings as the crank does, lifters wear against the cam shaft, rocker arms need adjusting periodically, and valves wear out their valve guides. Outboards have none of these items resulting in less friction and more horse power for the weight. Outboards are designed to run looser than a Chev 350 resulting in less friction and more power with less weight. Also according to a friend of mine who raced jet boats on the river for years, Jet pumps work best at HIGH RPM, outboards are designed to operate at high RPM for long periods of time, Chev 350 were not hence the bronze bushing style bearings, (cheaper to manufacture the bearings and easier to manufacture connecting rods and bearing journals since the extra size isn't needed to house a set of roller bearings. Last but not least mostnewer outboard motors have a anti-corrosion treatment in the water jacket to help prevent corroding while Chev 350 doesn't. Chev 350 is a great motor but Pound for Pound an outboard will kick it' ASS any day of the week!!!!! IMO Tup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Update: We went and took a look at the boat today, nice boat, but the 350 takes up way to much fishable room. So, we will be looking at other boat models and i think we are going to tone it down a bit 15-20k this time. I talked him into either an inboard or outboard jet or prop, so that opens up many choices now. All that is left is to do some looking around for the right boat for him and I. Thanks for all the input, this has been interesting reading all the responses, and wisdom about boats/motors. Keep em coming lol
 
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